I’m Done!

Yesterday was the last day of PC. Hard to believe, right? August seems so far distant in the past, and yet time has flown by. Only one exam stands between me and never having to look at these professors again (as long as I can avoid them in the hallways). 🙂

Surprisingly enough, I felt kind of empty after class yesterday. I couldn’t pinpoint why, but I just felt like I was in a funk. While others around me were ecstatic and beaming, I just felt so-so. And trust me, it’s NOT because I was sad the class was ending. I think part of it may have had to do with the “Life Talk” (for lack of a better title) we got from “the” professor (you know, the one that made me cry). The talk in which he told us that we should be the one whose light is still on when the partners go home at night. And that lawyers are three times more likely than the general population to suffer from clinical depression.

Real uplifting stuff on the last day of class, huh?

As I headed home, I continued to mull over the things our professor told us. I have decided that priority #1 when I get settled in my new home in a couple months (hopefully in colorful Colorado!) will be to find a Christian lawyer mentor. Not someone who just goes to church on Sunday, but someone who loves Jesus with all of her being. Someone who wants to glorify God in her law practice. I need someone who can help me figure out a balance between the “stay at the office until the partner go home” mentality and my knee-jerk reaction of, “I don’t answer to the partners at my firm. I’ll work hard, but I don’t have to pull ridiculous hours to do so.” 

But most of all, I want to be different. I want to be a lawyer who looks at the expectations of this career and seeks change. Who seeks to relieve some of the pressures that we type-A OCD lawyers put on ourselves, and who seeks balance and a healthy view of work and life.

And now, I’m busy wading through Texas Supreme Court cases and multiple outlines while studying for my exam on Saturday. I spent the whole day trying to figure out the difference between errors of commission and errors of omission. It sounds like it’d be easy, right? Think again! Here’s what the Texas Supreme Court had to say about the issue way back in 1992:

                           “The rules governing charge procedures are difficult enough;
                             the caselaw applying them has made compliance a labyrinth
                             daunting to the most experienced trial lawyer. Today, it is fair
                             to say that the process of telling the jury the applicable law and
                             inquiring of them their verdict is a risky gambit in which counsel
                             has less reason to know that he or she has protected a client’s rights
                             than at any other time in the trial.”



State Dep’t of Highways & Pub. Transp. v. Payne, 838 S.W.2d 235 (Tex. 1992).

Such an encouraging statement about the rule, isn’t it? That’s probably why it’s taken me all day to make some sort of sense of it in my head. Here’s hoping I’ve untangled it in the right way…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: